Curious Kanna

I am Kanna Ingleson, enthusiastic collector of top-end, unusual taxidermy in West London, UK. I believe that curiosity and collaboration are cool.

It started with an ordinary, one-eyed cased fish 6 years ago. Today my home resembles a natural history warehouse, and that's exactly how I like it.

I am the proud custodian of numerous pieces from the golden era of Victorian taxidermy. And that's why I can never claim that my collection has been ethically sourced. I can however state with certainty that I am not a fan of hunting and don't believe in killing for the sole purpose of taxidermy.

To see my collection of taxidermy and natural history curiousities, follow me on www.instagram.com/curiouskanna

Photo by Katherine Edden

 

#Taximag

I am the founder of #taximag, a quarterly magazine featuring the people who make up the vibrant taxidermy scene in the UK and Europe. 

It looks at the collections, the creative work and the personalities that form part of this magnificent sub-culture. 

To sign up for #taximag news and updated, go to www.hashtag-taximag.com.

ONLINE: Have a look at #taximag online: www.issuu.com/taximag

PRINT: #taximag is for sale on ebay in a contemporary and compact A5 format.

If you would like to be featured in #taximag, if you have any good ideas, or if you fancy being a contributor, please email me on hello@curiouskanna.com

#Taximag cover photo by Katherine Edden

Taxidermy Revival

I blame Damien Hirst. No, not his foray into formaldehyde, but his bold £1-million offer to save the entire Walter Potter collection shortly before bits of it ended up in a living room near you.

Love it or loathe it, that's probably when taxidermy was firmly planted in the public domain after which it quickly entered the UK mainstream. You can tell that for certain by the stuffed creatures that routinely make up the window dressing of city shops (like the fine example on the left) and that adorn suburban lives.

As with all things, timing has been critical. A renewed interest in all things analogue, an appreciation for real, practiced skill, our ever present need to be different, and the rise of crap telly have all helped turn the recent resurgence into a full-on revival.

Long may it continue.

Curious Kanna's Instagram

Today was good for garnets. They light up the foreshore on a sunny day.
These books are great for adding context to collecting in general and mudlarking in particular.
Very cool Thames fragment with an
Amongst all the usual bone offcuts, I found this interesting piece.
Old bottle neck with the cork still in place. It's always fun finding these.
But why is this on the foreshore?
Another Thames critter.
This is ever so slightly worrying.
I left this behind on the Thames today. Any idea what it is?
Guess who?
Spent a lovely afternoon at the museum in Tring. This happened every time a donation was made. We need more of these.
I like this juxtaposition and I think I'll keep it like this for a while.
Follow @sussextaxidermy and check out his work. This blue Arctic fox is one of his newest pieces and has just been added to my collection. Thank you Robert!
Blue Arctic fox in the collection. Thank you @sussextaxidermy
Do yourself a favour and follow @sussextaxidermy Most of the work that he posts is for sale and it won't cost you an arm and a leg. Remember, you heard it here first!
Great new piece in the collection by my friend and favourite taxidermist, @sussextaxidermy
Keeping it real.
Shoe leather with a wooden heal, preserved in part by the anaerobic Thames mud.
The old and the new.

Taxidermy on the Twittersphere



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